World Vision International
article • Wednesday, April 27th 2016

A more conducive place for learning

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Erica, 11, is very excited for the coming school year, as her classroom will be repaired.

More than two years after typhoon Haiyan, World Vision continues to work alongside disaster-affected communities. Through its Hope for Tacloban Children project, nine schools will be retrofitted this summer for students to have typhoon-resilient classrooms.

Erica, 11, is an incoming grade six pupil in Patoc Elementary School.

"The summer may have just started but I feel excited to go back to school. I am imagining how my classroom would look like. I'm sure there will be a lot of changes that will encourage us to do better in our classes," she expressed.

Her school will have 12 classrooms repaired, six of which will have comfort rooms (private toilets). This project will benefit 472 students at the school.

I am very happy that you continue to help us in rebuilding our school... it also gives parents and teachers peace of mind knowing that our children are in disaster-resilient buildings.

"I am very happy that you continue to help us in rebuilding our school. This does not only provide a conducive learning space for the students but it also gives parents and teachers peace of mind knowing that our children are in disaster-resilient buildings," said Laurence Costibolo, school principal.

The classrooms were designed based on the needs and specifications found during the assessment process. Roofs that have wood trusses will be replaced with steel to strengthen the structure. The structural components such as beams, walls, and columns will be repaired. The sanitation and security were considered in the design, hence the repair of comfort rooms and plumbing.

The classrooms were designed based on the needs and specifications found during the assessment process.

"We used to share comfort rooms with other classes. I felt ashamed when I had to go to the next room to use the toilet because classes were disturbed when someone is coming in and out of the classroom," Erica shared.

The 2-month vacation is an advantage in completing the classrooms. World Vision is ensuring that they can be used by the start of the school year.

World Vision has been working with Patoc Elementary School since the early days of typhoon Haiyan. Throughout the partnership, school authorities, even students like Erica have committed to ensure maintenance of the facilities provided.

"I am very willing to clean our classroom everyday. At the same time, as an active leader in our school, I will encourage my schoolmates to help," she shared.

To date, based on the Department of Education Regional Office VIII's data, 26 more schools in East Leyte that were affected by typhoon Haiyan, are in need for both repair and reconstruction of classrooms.

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